Company Contact information Description
Stanton Bamboo
95 North Stone St.
West Suffield, CT 06093
U.S.A.
860-668-9565 Fax:
Chris Stanton

Bamboo species for the northeast, cold hardy in zones 5&6. Specialty Balled & Burlaped bamboo plants ideal for screening,groves,or specimen. Visits by appointment only, call ahead. Local installation, grove management and delivery available.

Plants

U = Unknown
  Height and Diameter information Temperature information Sun/Shade information   More information
Genus species Common Name Max Ht
Ft
Max Dia
In
Min Temp
F
Sun
5=full
sun
Description Synonym Sources More
Info
Clumper/Runner
HibanobambusaA running genus from Japan once thought to be a natural bigeneric hybrid between Sasa veitchii and Phyllostachys nigra 'Henon', but with little evidence to support that idea.
Hibanobambusa
tranquillans
'Shiroshima'
  16.00 1.30 3 4 This form has strikingly attractive leaves variegated in cream and green. The colors persist throughout the year.   Sources Photos from bambooweb.info
Runner
PhyllostachysMedium to giant runners which have a distinct groove above pairs of unequal branches at mid-culm nodes. They shoot in spring.
Phyllostachys
atrovaginata
INCENSE BAMBOO 35.00 2.80 -5 5 The shoots are among those having the least bite when raw. These plants were formerly listed as P. congesta. Phyllostachys congesta Sources Photos from bambooweb.info
Runner
Phyllostachys
aureosulcata
Yellow Groove 45.00 2.20 -5 5 The culms are more slender and delicate than golden bamboo; young culms are green with a yellow groove. Culm internodes distinctly rough to the touch when young, and an occasional culm has a zigzag kink.   Sources Photos from bambooweb.info
Runner
Phyllostachys
aureosulcata
'Aureocaulis'
  26.00 1.50 -5 5 Culms are entirely yellow except for a few vertical green stripes.   Sources Photos from bambooweb.info
Runner
Phyllostachys
aureosulcata
'Spectabilis'
Green groove 26.00 1.50 -5 5 The culms are yellow with a green groove, just opposite of the typical form. Smaller in hottest areas.   Sources Photos from bambooweb.info
Runner
Phyllostachys
bissetii
  40.00 2.00 -10 5 A vigorously growing species whose culms are somewhat darker green than 'golden bamboo'. It is one of the first species of the genus to shoot in the spring.   Sources Photos from bambooweb.info
Runner
Phyllostachys
bissetii
'Dwarf'
  18.00 1.00 -10 5 Differs by being smaller, and having whitish patches on the culms; hardier, perhaps.   Sources Photos from bambooweb.info
Runner
Phyllostachys
nigra
'Hale'
  20.00 1.50 0 4 Similar to the type, but smaller and hardier. Culms turn black almost immediately.   Sources Photos from bambooweb.info
Runner
Phyllostachys
propinqua
'Beijing'
  U U -10 U Shoots are gray, leaves larger. Reported to take temperatures down to -15F, grows faster than the type.   Sources Photos from bambooweb.info
Runner
Phyllostachys
rubromarginata
  55.00 2.80 -5 5 Noted for its good quality wood and edible shoots,it tolerates cold, dry winds. Tests in Alabama showed it to be superior in culm production and cold tolerance.   Sources Photos from bambooweb.info
Runner
PleioblastusGenus of small and medium size running bamboos with persistent culm leaves. Most are native to Japan, were formerly classified in Arundinaria.
Pleioblastus
viridistriatus
Dwarf Green Stripe 3.00 0.30 0 2 The new leaves in spring are golden-yellow with green stripes, about 7 by 1.5 inch, densely hairy on the lower surface. Old culms should be mowed in winter making way for brilliant new growth in spring.   Sources Photos from bambooweb.info
Runner
SasaRunning species, dwarf or up to 6 feet tall, with at most one branch per node. The leaves are usually large.
Sasa
kurilensis
  10.00 0.80 0 2 One of the most widely distributed bamboos in Japan. Its native range extends to 50? north on Sakhalin Island, Russia.   Sources Photos from bambooweb.info
Runner
Sasa
shimidzuana
  6.00 0.30 0 2 Leaves up to 11 inches long and 2 inches wide, the underside covered with soft hairs. AKA S. asahinae Sasa asahinae Sources
Runner


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